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The Washington Post
(University of Maryland International Piano Festival)

Tryon's art is one of proportion and taste, deriving its strength from understatement. Her extensive technical resources are used with enormous restraint in a style which, clearly by choice, avoids both brilliance and flamboyance. She possesses virtuosic control, particularly over the lower end of the dynamic scale. Her ability to play passages of intricate fingerwork with lightness and rapidity is truly magical. She never strains - even the most fiendish sections seem simple in her hands.


The Boston Globe
(Newport International Piano Festival, Rhode Island)

Elegant in a billowy pale raspberry gown with spangled bodice, Tryon looks to be a charming if reserved, entirely ladylike English matron. But don't be fooled. There are reserves of passion and power that erupt in her playing, even when there is never a hair out of place nor a telltale bead of perspiration. Indeed, that is one of the marvels of her playing—it all looks so effortless. Her Scarlatti was notable for the pellucid quality of the passage work, the evenness of the trills, the charm and ebullience of the expression, the magisterial command of difficult techniques like the chains of thirds….Tryon’s Mozart was full of dark depths. Particularly impressive was the way she extracted the maximum expressive juice from Mozart’s unexpected changes of harmony, his chromatic dissonances.

Tryon’s Liszt made it clear that we had entered the 19th century and were communing with one of that period’s seminal geniuses. Although it was the same instrument she was playing, the Yamaha piano sounded entirely different…. Finally, there was the “Mephisto Waltz” with its diabolical energy and seductive lyricism. Tryon just let it rip, emerging cool and undaunted after wrestling with the devil.”


The Guardian (Manchester)

She happily pointed Walton's rhythms and, generally, insinuated her instrument into the variable textures with remarkable discretion and sensibility. I have long admired Valerie Tryon's piano playing, and take pleasure in this opportunity to do some measure of justice to her gifts.

Sir Neville Cardus


The American Record Guide
Liszt Recording

Valerie Tryon is a very strong pianist and a solid musician...Everything is direct, backed by a dream technique...Tryon impresses me as the best pianist so far in the ongoing Naxos cycle of the complete Piano Music of Franz Liszt.

Harold Schonberg


Fanfare Magazine
Liszt Recording

Valerie Tryon's unique warmth of phrasing and radiance of tone, bespeaking a labour of love, lift these [Liszt transcriptions] out of the category of mere curiosities or addenda to new and captivating life. Tryon's commitment never flags.

Adrian Corleonis


The Daily Telegraph (London)
Wigmore Hall - Liszt Festival

Miss Tryon chose the three Concert Studies. Her splendid technical address and glittering tone further underlined a combination of exceptional musical gifts and single-mindedness not common among pianists of any age.


BBC Music Magazine

Valerie Tryon...is a Liszt specialist, but a virtuoso with a brain, and in the Chopin Ballades she takes the hardest route of all: she plays close to the score with as little license as possible...Since the Fourth Ballade has more variety, more sections of different character than the preceding three Ballades, the performer has more decisions to make about changes of gear...Tryon probably has a better feeling than anyone for these "changes of gear" so that the narrative is articulated as powerfully as it can be, and she goes for the final section like a bat out of hell.

Adrian Jack


Clavier Magazine
Liszt Recording ("Educo")

Valerie Tryon...performs this recital with extraordinary brilliance, yet never percussively. I derived more pleasure from this recording than from some big-name recordings on major labels and recommend it highly.


Gazette de Lausanne (Switzerland)

One finds oneself in the presence of a great artist.


The Times (London)
Queen Elizabeth Hall

Two widely differing facets of Liszt's keyboard writing were to be heard in yesterday's piano recital by Valerie Tryon. The profoundly subdued "Bénédiction de Dieu dans la Solitude", in Miss Tryon's performance, unobtrusively contemplative rather than assertive, was complemented by the tense representation of the Inferno in the Dante Sonata. While the bravura passagework and ominous descending tritones have lost some of their original overwhelming dramatic potency, this does not preclude their present-day impact at the hands of so accomplished a Liszt interpreter as Miss Tryon. But the outstanding feature of her playing was a soft, yet richly-toned cantabile which, in the "Bénédiction", seemingly transcended the essentially mechanical origins of the sound, and in Funérailles created a solemn elegiac mood alternating with the magnificent inevitability of the more martial sections.


The American Record Guide
Chopin Recording

The pianist of the past she most reminds me of would be Leopold Godowsky.If I sound excited, I am. I would put this disc among the best Chopin recordings of the last decade.

Harold Schonberg


The Times (London)
Wigmore Hall - Liszt Festival

Valerie Tryon began with a cogent performance of the Bach-Liszt A minor Prelude and Fugue, this being all the more enjoyable because in these puritanical days such arrangements are not quite respectable..."Au bord d'une source" sparked demurely, "Czardas macabre" glowered darkly, while the Dante Sonata received a performance of great force and pungency. Alas, it is not possible even to note all the pieces by the absurdly neglected composer that Miss Tryon gave us, but we shall be lucky if this feast of magnificent piano playing is surpassed in the entire festival.

Max Harrison


The Yorkshire Post

An enthralling and very beautiful performance of Schumann's Fantasia in C, op. 17 was given by the pianist Valerie Tryon. Hers was a cool, almost languid approach, at least on the surface. Beneath was the most splendid musical control, with some lovely transitions from section to section and, most appealing of all, a rare keyboard touch of exceptional loveliness in its tonal refinements.


The Globe & Mail (Toronto)

The afternoon's two triumphs, both involving pianist Valerie Tryon, were unexpectedly thrilling. Mozart's Piano Concerto no. 12 (K. 414) is not among his best loved, but yesterday's performance was one of those rare, blessed occasions when journeymen musicians transcend themselves. Tryon handled her solo with affection, making it all seem effortless. Here was delicate, intimate Mozart, most enchanting in the slow movement.

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